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Contemplating Psalm 16:8-9, Spurgeon [in The Treasury of David] outlines the importance and benefits of an ongoing consideration of and meditation on God:

A sense of the divine presence our best support. It yields,

1. Good confidence concerning things without. I shall not be moved.
2. Good cheer within. My heart is glad.
3. Good music for the living tongue. My glory rejoiceth.
4. Good hope for the dying body. My flesh also, etc.

He also offers the testimony of other faithful men on this topic of the contemplation of God from this passage:

David did not by fits and starts set the Lord before him; but he “always” set the Lord before him in his course; he had his eye upon the Lord, and so much the Hebrew word imports: I have equally set the Lord before me; that is the force of the original word, that is, I have set the Lord before me, at one time as well as another, without any irregular affections or passions, etc. In every place, in every condition, in every company, in every employment, and in every enjoyment, I have set the Lord equally before me; and this raised him, and this will raise any Christian, by degrees, to a very great height of holiness. Thomas Brooks.

He that by faith eyes God continually as his protector in trouble shall not be moved with any evil that he suffers, and he that eyes God by faith as his pattern in holiness, shall not be moved from doing that which is good. This thought—the Lord is at our right hand —keeps us from turning either to the right hand or to the left. It is said of Enoch, that “he walked with God” (Genesis 5:22), and though the history of his life be very short, yet it is said of him a second time (Genesis 5:24), that “he walked with God.” He walked so much with God that he walked as God: he did not “walk” (which kind of walking the apostle reproves, 1 Corinthians 3:3), “as men.” He walked so little like the world, that his stay was little in the world. “He was not, “saith the text, “for God took him.” He took him from the world to himself, or, as the author to the Hebrews reports it, “he was translated that he should not see death, for he had this testimony, that he pleased God.” Joseph Caryl.

Like as the gnomon doth ever behold the north star, whether it be closed and shut up in a coffer of gold, silver, or wood, never losing its nature; so a faithful Christian man, whether he abound in wealth or be pinched with poverty, whether he be of high or low degree in this world, ought continually to have his faith and hope surely built and grounded upon Christ, and to have his heart and mind fast fixed and settled in him, and to follow him through thick and thin, through fire and water, through wars and peace, through hunger and cold, through friends and foes, through a thousand perils and dangers, through the surges and waves of envy, malice, hatred, evil speeches, railing sentences, contempt of the world, flesh, and devil, and even in death itself, be it never so bitter, cruel, and tyrannical, yet never to lose sight and view of Christ, never to give over faith, hope, and trust in him. Robert Cawdray.

Lord, as we go to worship this morning, keep our eyes and hearts attuned to you. The burdens of the week may be a distraction to us; might your glory enrapture us instead.  And as we leave worship this morning, likewise might you be ever before us in all that is done in the seven days ahead. Might sinful attractions be unattractive to us.  Might our daily activities and responsibilities be filled with a sense of your purpose.  Might we find satisfaction in you more than in our circumstances or desires.  Might you be ever before us in all that we do this day and this week. For the honor and name of Christ we pray, amen.